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Pop Chain: How Does Popping Work? March 23, 2017

Pop My Mind is a creative platform which challenges artists, aspiring or experienced, to be inspired by what they see, hear or read. To find out more about how Pop My Mind works or to see our current submissions, please follow the link here.

The main aim of our platform is for artists to be inspired by fellow artists, an idea we like to call ‘Popping’. Popping is what makes our platform unique as it challenges our artists to explore works and themes that perhaps they never previously tried their hand at. In this article we’ll look at an example of a ‘pop chain’.

 

Prompt: Joy by Pop My Mind

The base of this pop chain is Pop My Mind’s prompt Joy which as described by Professor W. Gerrod Parrott in 2001 as “one of the six primary human emotions.” Artists were challenged from this point on to find inspiration from the prompt in any medium. The prompt currently has 14 pops and produced a wide variety of different interpretations of what ‘joy’ means to people.

 

First Pop: Wave  created by Sarah Tappenden

Sarah’s Piece Wave is a painting created in response to Pop My Mind’s prompt Joy. The painting is abstract is nature and is bred from Sarah’s emotional responses to the idea of joy. The use of blue and purple could be interpreted that Sarah feels a certain attraction to these colours. Sarah’s work has inspired many on the platform with the piece currently have been popped 28 times! We will now look at one of those pops to show how the chain continues.

 

Next Pop: Life created by Richard Day  – Listen to the audio piece here!

(Image above: When music comes to life by SeelaZ)

Richard’s track Life is a work that has been created in response to Sarah’s painting Wave which he describes as having “inspired me to finish it and upload the result.” The track features vocals with instrument accompaniment which focuses on the colours in Sarah’s painting. Richard said that “the colours and texture of the painting reminded me of an intro to a song that I had been working on” and through his composition, Richard has produced an effective and chilled tone. Pop My Mind has provided Richard with a platform that has allowed him to react and create art in alignment with other artists.

 

Next Pop: Floating Feather created by Lindsay Elise Jolly  – Watch Lindsay’s film here!

(Image above: Falling Skies photo taken by Lindsay Elise Jolly)

In response to Richard’s track, Lindsay has created a film called Floating Feather which “echoes the ups and downs of life”. The film has a white filter which contrasts reality with surrealism.  In the film the feather sticks out against the white background as it falls and rises erratically, capturing the aim that Lindsay was trying to achieve. The word ‘floating’ means to be suspended or buoyant in water or air, and through Lindsay’s piece we see the feather floating through life unsure as to when it will fall. We can see through these three works how popping can evoke many different responses, but also allow artists to express themselves through any medium that they wish to.

 

Next Pop: The Helium Balloon Takes Flight created by Luke Mayo  – Read Luke’s poem here!

(Image above: Stave in the Sky photo taken by Oliver Squirrell)

Luke was inspired by Lindsay’s film and decided to capture his own idea of “ups and downs” through the image of a balloon. His poem The Helium Balloon Takes Flight contains 7 stanzas where we clearly see the rise of the balloon at the start but then the fall as the poem continues. By looking at the differences in Sarah’s work Wave and Luke’s poem we can see how far their pieces differ yet through the interlinking pieces of the pop chain, can see the process of how the pieces are loosely linked.

 

Feel inspired by seeing this pop chain? Maybe you could start one yourself! Join us at Pop My Mind today and start producing the work you want with inspiration from others! For information on joining the platform please follow the link here.

Get popping today!

 

Written by Jack Bailey

 

Featured image is Exploring by Rebecca Freeman

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